7/21/2006

El Nightmare

Filed under: — Kate @ 8:11 am EST

For a moment there yesterday morning, I thought I’d wandered into one of my nightmares: SEPTA buses and more SEPTA buses.

Everywhere! As far as the eye could see! And none of them actually moving!

I was getting a little freaked out, but then I spotted this:

And I have to admit, my first thought was “El Shuttle? WTF? Does SEPTA think that’s Spanish for ‘bus’ or something?”

Well, it took me a minute, but I eventually remembered that the Market-Frankford El is currently bussing between 40th and 69th Streets.

Ugh. That IS a nightmare.

5 Responses to “El Nightmare”

  1. Amber Says:

    “El Shuttle? WTF? Does SEPTA think that’s Spanish for ‘bus’ or something?”

    Oddly, the first time I saw the El Shuttle, I thought something very similar. Now I just call it “El Bussy-Bus” to lighten my heart and make riding it less traumatic.

  2. Stan Says:

    Hmm, I think you might want to revise your name yet again. I’d go with El Vroom-vroom. It’s short for El Vroom-vroom honk-honk screech.

  3. howard Says:

    I’ve been meaning to pick this nit for a few days now, but more important matters (read that: matters of any importance whatsoever) have delayed me.

    The Spanish word for nightmare is “pesadilla” - it looks like you were having trouble with that in your blog title. Speaking of which, it would actually be “la pesadilla” instead of “el pesadilla.”

    And this is all assuming you post title was some sort of Spanglish concoction - or did I miss the point of the post (short attention span and whatnot) entirely?

    ;)

  4. Edo Says:

    Howard - the “El” in the post title refers to the Market-Frankford subway line, which is commonly referred to as the “El” - short for “Elevated”, since much of its run is above ground.

    Therefore, the blog title refers directly to the subway, and indirectly to the content of the post, the “El Shuttle”. Given that there is no universal translation for shuttle in spanish, you could say “el bus”, or “el colectivo”, or “el combi”, depending on your latin american or old world country of preference.

    Clear? Crystal, I presume.

  5. Kate Says:

    Thanks for that very thorough explanation, Edo. :-)